What’s Growing On At The Community Garden

  • Osha Hayden

“Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food and medicine to the mind.” – Luther Burbank

An enthusiastic group of garden volunteers gathered recently and hauled a mountain of wood chips to garden pathways and the south fence line to keep invasive Bermuda Grass in check. A small fence line was also installed as a buffer to keep unleashed dogs and their potty business away from the garden. Thanks to Wayne Woogen and Ernie Carter for major help with the fencing.

How to Rid Your Garden of Snails

Are you tired of seeing snail damaged plants? One of our gardeners offers this sage advice: “A good way to catch garden snails is to place a terra cotta flower pot upside down in your garden, with one end slightly propped up, maybe on a rock or garden border edge. The snails will crawl and gather inside the pot, as protection from too much rain/cold or heat. One early Spring day, I had a convention of about 50 snails inside the pot!”

In the Garden

Fava beans and edible Johnny Jump Up Violas (Viola tricolor) are abundantly flowering throughout the garden. Nasturtiums will soon join the party. Did you know that fava leaves and flowers are also edible? You might want to try adding viola flowers, nasturtiums and fava leaves to your salad. If you want to get wild, try some fava leaf pesto.

A recent survey of our gardeners revealed some of the best performing crops they have planted.

Scallions, garlic and chives are thriving. Perennial onions (Allium fistulosum) keep coming back year after year. After a few heads form seeds, you can plant the seeds for new starts. Organic scallions from the market can easily be planted – just cut off the bottom ½”with the rootlets and bury them barely below ground. Soon, you will have a new crop of onions.

We had a bumper crop of tomatoes and squash last year. Best performers are Black Krim, Chocolate Cherry, Early Girl Tomatoes, patty pan squash, yellow crookneck and zucchini. Persian and lemon cucumbers are favorites. Right now we have green beans and peas surging tender tendrils toward the sun.

We are lucky to live in one of the most abundantly fertile places in the world.

For more information about joining the garden please contact the OVA Office at 539-1611 or email Oakmontcommunitygarden@gmail.com Spaces are available.

Gardeners busy with “wood chip” day

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